Open Questions: Neutron Stars and Pulsars

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See also: Supernovae -- Gamma-ray astronomy

Introduction

Supernova remnants

Quark stars

Magnetars


Recommended references: Web sites

Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Recommended references: Books

Introduction



Recommended references: Web sites

Site indexes

Galaxy: Pulsars
Categorized site directory. Entries usually include descriptive annotations.


Sites with general resources

Neutron Stars and Pulsars
Part of NASA's Imagine the Universe site. Contains basic information about neutron stars and pulsars, computer animations, and links to related topics. There is also a more advanced level page on the topic.
Jodrell Bank Pulsar Group
Home page of group involved with pulsar research. Site includes tutorial information on pulsars, publications, and references to useful resources.
The Italian Pulsar Group
Home page of research group at the University of Cagliari (Italy). Site includes information on the group and some external links.
ATNF Pulsar Group
Home page of research group at the Australia Telescope National Facility. Site includes information on the group, some external links, general information on pulsar astronomy, and a Web interface to a pulsar catalog.


Surveys, overviews, tutorials

Neutron star
Article from Wikipedia. See also Pulsar.
Introduction to neutron stars
Very good introductory discussion of neutron stars by M. Coleman Miller. Also includes remarks on gamma ray bursts.
Frequently Asked Questions About Pulsars
Very good set of questions and answers, by John Simonetti.
Supernovae, Neutron Stars & Pulsars
Good explanations and external links, part of Gene Smith's Astronomy Tutorial.
Binary and Millisecond Pulsars
Fairly detailed technical article, by Duncan R. Lorimer.
'Magnetars', Soft Gamma Repeaters & Very Strong Magnetic Fields
Very good article describing magnetars and other types of supernova remnants with strong magnetic fields, by Robert Duncan. Includes a number of external links.
Neutron Stars
A ScienceWeek "symposium" consisting of excerpts and summaries of articles from various sources.
A Tutorial on Radio Pulsars
Extensive notes from a series of lectures.
Making a Millisecond Pulsar
January 2006 press with information on research into the formation of millisecond pulsars.
Neutron stars, pulsars
A page with overview information from the Astronomy Unbound site.
Neutron Stars/X-ray Binaries
Part of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Center site. Provides general information on neutron stars.
Pulsars
Brief, single-page overview.
Astronomy of the invisible
September 2003 article from Physics World, by Giovanni F. Bignami. "Neutron stars might be the dimmest objects in the universe but they are also cosmic laboratories for extreme physics that are tailor-made for X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy."
Strongest magnet in the cosmos
January 2003 article from Physics World, by Silvia Zane and Roberto Turolla. "Now an international team of astrophysicists studying the RXTE data has found evidence for what is known as a magnetar -- the most magnetic object in the universe."
Pulsars, glitches and superfluids
January 1998 article from Physics World, by M. Ali Alpar. "Astronomers have long been intrigued by occasional "glitches" in the rotation of pulsars."
Pulsar Bursts Coming From Beachball-Sized Structures
March 12, 2003 press release on important new observations of the Crab Nebula pulsar.
Nucleus sheds light on neutron stars
June 2001 news article from Physics Web. "A neutron star may be around 10 kilometres in diameter, but it is governed by the same forces that arrange the neutrons in an atomic nucleus just femtometres across. This means that studies of neutron-rich nuclei could provide insights into their astrophysical counterparts."
The pulsar's powerhouse
December 2000 news article from Physics Web. "Astronomers believe that highly magnetic neutron stars - known as magnetars - could be the driving force behind a little-understood group of pulsars. 'Anomalous x-ray pulsars', as they are known, earn their name because scientists are unsure what fuels their potent x-ray emissions."
Wobbling pulsar discovered
August 2000 news article from Physics Web. "Astronomers at Jodrell Bank Observatory in the UK have discovered a wobbling pulsar for the first time."
Slow period upsets pulsar theories
August 1999 news article from Physics Web. "Australian astronomers have discovered a radio pulsar with a period so long that they might have to rethink theories of how pulsars emit radiation."
Fast spinning pulsar
January 1998 news article from Physics Web. "Astronomers have discovered the fastest-spinning pulsar. The star rotates at speeds previously thought impossible."
All in the Timing
December 1996 Scientific American In Focus article about NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer satellite used to study neutron stars and pulsars, and especially the msyterious millisecond pulsars.
Neutron Stars Contain Diamond Cores
April 2001 news article from Scientific American.
New Pulsars Help Solve Mystery
April 2001 news article from Scientific American, about young pulsars as possible sources of high-energy gamma rays.
Neutron stars twist Einstein's theory
September 2000 news article from Science News, about observations of neutron stars that provide evidence for Lense-Thirring frame dragging predicted by the general theory of relativity.


Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Magnetars
Chryssa Kouveliotou; Robert C. Duncan; Christopher Thompson
Scientific American, February 2003
Let There Be Spin
Ron Cowen
Science News, July 13, 2002, pp. 24-25
It has been a puzzle how very rapidly rotating neutron stars acquire their angular momentum. The answer may be that the spin results from the star's gradual consumption of mass from a companion.
[References]


Recommended references: Books


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