Open Questions: Cloning

[Home] [Up] [Glossary] [Topic Index] [Site Map]

See also: Stem cells

Introduction

Parthenogenesis

Eggs from stem cells

Cloning techniques for reprogramming cells


Recommended references: Web sites

Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Recommended references: Books

Introduction



Recommended references: Web sites

Site indexes

Galaxy: Cloning
Categorized site directory. Entries usually include descriptive annotations.


Sites with general resources

Yahoo News Full Coverage: Cloning
Links to recent news stories from various sources. Also includes links to sites dealing with cloning.
New Scientist Special Report: Cloning and Stem Cells
Good collection of news articles on cloning and stem cells. Includes a Cloning FAQ.
Roslin Institute: Research Programmes
Roslin Institute is the organization that first successfully cloned a mammal (Dolly). Information on cloning is here and also in the section on transgenics and biotechnology.
Genes & Cloning
Good collection of resources on the topic -- external links, magazine articles, and books.


Surveys, overviews, tutorials

Cloning: Past, Present, and the Exciting Future
Good article for a general audience by Marie A. Di Berardino. Describes the process of nuclear transfer used in cloning, and the medical benefits that are possible with cloning used to produce embryonic stem cells. Contains a good list of suggested reading.
Welcome to the World of Cloning
Fairly good overview of various topics related to cloning. Contains a number of brief articles and some external links.
Ten years after Dolly, where cloning's going?
March 2007 news feature article. Describes history and current state of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.
Cloning and Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer
A ScienceWeek "symposium" consisting of excerpts and summaries of articles from various sources.
What Clones?
December 24, 2001 Scientific American In Depth article questioning claims about the claims of success in cloning human embryos.
What are the potential medical benefits of animal cloning?
October 1999 Scientific American "Ask the Experts" article. Response by James Robl.
Dolly's Legacy
June 1999 Scientific American In Depth article, subtitled "Nuclear transfer--used to clone Dolly and now owned by Geron--may help scientists develop more potent stem-cell therapies."
Send in the Clones
July 1998 Scientific American In Depth article, subtitled "Using a new technique, scientists have cloned clones from clones".
Cloning Hits the Big Time
September 1997 Scientific American In Depth article, subtitled "Genetic copying of animals is attracting commercial interest."
A Clone in Sheep's Clothing
March 1997 Scientific American In Depth article, subtitled "A sheep cloned from adult cells opens vast scientific possibilities and ethical dilemmas."
Cloning reverses ageing of cells
April 2000 news article about how cloned cells may show less aging as measured by telomere length.
Cloning Extends Life of Cells - And Cows?
April 2000 news article from Science News, about a study of cloned cows that suggests cloned cells and animals might have a longer lifespan than normal.
A Fantastical Experiment
April 1997 news article from Science News, about the science behind the cloning of a sheep.


Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Transfer Troubles
Cathryn M. Delude
Scientific American, October 2004
The First Human Cloned Embryo
Jose B. Cibelli; Robert P. Lanza; Michael D. West
Scientific American, January 2002, pp. 44-51
Cloning of human embryos with the ultimate goal of theraputic use is an accomplished fact. The potential therapeutic benefits are enormous.
Dolly Was Lucky
John Travis
Science News, October 20, 2001, pp. 250-251
The success rate in producing clones of mammals is still very low. It is suspected that this is because of problems with gene regulation in cloned embryos, possibly involving problems with the process of methylation.
Cloning Noah's Ark
Robert P. Lanza; Betsy L. Dresser; Philip Damiani
Scientific American, November 2000, pp. 84-89
The ability to clone mammals, even though it has existed only a very few years, has already led to a number of applications. One of the latest is a new way to preserve endangered species.
Cloning for Medicine
Ian Wilmut
Scientific American, December 1998, pp. 58-63
Medical applications of cloning technology include drug manufacture, transplants, and basic research.
A Clone of One's Own
Virginia Morell
Discover, May 1998, pp. 82-89
The technology for cloning mammals is now a reality. It is only a matter of time before it is applied to humans.


Recommended references: Books


Home

Copyright © 2002 by Charles Daney, All Rights Reserved