Open Questions: Regenerative Medicine

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See also: Stem cells -- Developmental biology

Introduction

Transdifferentiation


Recommended references: Web sites

Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Recommended references: Books

Introduction



Recommended references: Web sites

Site indexes

Galaxy: Tissue Engineering
Categorized site directory. Entries usually include descriptive annotations.

Sites with general resources

Tissue Engineering Pages
Web site oriented to professionals, with news stories, external links, conference information, and information on companies related to tissue engineering.
Children's Hospital Boston - Laboratory for Transplantation and Tissue Engineering
Brief overview of laboratory research in tissue engineering.

Surveys, overviews, tutorials

Sight for Sore Eyes
March 2007 Scientific American News Scan article, subtitled "Progress in cell transplants to heal damaged retinas."
Mending the Spinal Cord
September 2005 Scientific American Sidebar, subtitled "Researchers are finding ways to help nerves regenerate, and hope for therapies is growing."
The Cloning Connection
Brief June 2005 Scientific American article, subtitled "Cloned tissues from stem cells might beat immune rejection."
Lens Crafters in the Lab
July 2000 Scientific American In Focus article, subtitled "Two teams have found a way to bioengineer the cornea--the thin layer of cells covering the eye like a pane of glass."
The regeneration gap
November 22, 2001 article from Nature Science Update on how studies of animals capable of body-part regeneration may be relevant to regenerative medicine in humans.


Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Starting anew
Susan Gaidos
Science News, February 13, 2010
Scientists turn to lowly creatures to unlock the secrets of regeneration.
The Regeneration Recipe
Megan Scudellari
The Scientist, August 2009
Can natural regenerators such as the newt teach scientists about the ingredients needed to grow new limbs and organs? Even in, say, mammals?
How to Grow New Organs
Ali Khademhosseini; Joseph P. Vacanti; Robert Langer
Scientific American, May 2009
Regrowing Limbs: Can People Regenerate Body Parts?
Ken Muneoka, Manjong Han; David M. Gardiner
Scientific American, April 2008
Betting on Better Organs
Alison McCook
The Scientist, December 2007
Will you soon be able to buy your own bladder?
Test-Tube Teeth
Paul T. Sharpe; Conan S. Young
Scientific American, August 2005
Rebuilding Broken Hearts
Smadar Cohen; Jonathan Leor
Scientific American, November 2004
Biologists and engineers working together in the fledgling field of tissue engineering are within reach of one of their greatest goals: constructing a living human heart patch.
Brain, Repair Yourself
Fred H. Gage
Scientific American, September 2003
The Human Body Shop
Doug Garr
Technology Review, April 2001, pp. 72-79
The field is called tissue engineering, and the objective is to induce cells to grow into transplantable organs outside the body. One key hurdle is vascularization -- providing organs with functioning blood vessels.
Repairing the Damaged Spinal Cord
John W. McDonald
Scientific American, September 1999, pp. 64-73
Promising new possibilities are now appearing that may enable repair or regeneration of damaged spinal cords.
Growing New Organs
David J. Mooney; Antonios G. Mikos
Scientific American, April 1999, pp. 60-67
The first steps have been taken toward the creation of synthetic human organs. The challenge lies in harnessing the body's own methods of generating specific tissue types.


Recommended references: Books


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