Open Questions: Proteomics

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See also: Protein chemistry and biology

Introduction

Protein structure

Protein function


Recommended references: Web sites

Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Recommended references: Books

Introduction



Recommended references: Web sites

Site indexes

Open Directory Project: Proteomics
Categorized and annotated links. A version of this list is at Google, with entries sorted in "page rank" order. May also be found at Netscape.


Sites with general resources

Nature: Proteomics Technology Feature
Collection of articles, papers, and other materials from Nature related to proteomics.
The Post-Genome Project
August 2001 Scientific American article by Karen Hopkin, subtitled, "Whether The Human Proteome Will Be Successfully Mapped In Three Years Depends On How You Define 'Proteome'".
Human Protein Reference Database
"The Human Protein Reference Database represents a centralized platform to visually depict and integrate information pertaining to domain architecture, post-translational modifications, interaction networks and disease association for each protein in the human proteome."
The Human Proteome Organisation
HUPO's mission is to consolidate and coordinate activities of other proteome organizations, to promote scientific and educational activities related to proteomics technologies, and to help disseminate knowledge of the proteome of humans and other organisms. The site includes external links, among a number of other resources.


Surveys, overviews, tutorials

Protein crystallography: the human genome in 3-D
May 1998 Physics World article, by Naomi Chayen and John Helliwell. "Recent developments in X-ray crystallography at synchrotron radiation sources and progress in the production of good-quality protein crystals are leading to important advances in our knowledge of protein structure and function."


Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

An Insoluble Problem?
Robert Michael Stroud
The Scientist, May 2011
The challenges of crystallizing membrane proteins - and how they're being overcome.
The Proteomics Payoff
Jon Cohen
Technology Review, October 2001, pp. 54-60
Now that the human genome is mapped, the problem is to understand exactly what identified genes do. Such research is known as functional genomics or -- insofar as it is largely the study of the proteins that genes encode -- proteomics. This work currently involves listing all identifiable proteins (collectively known as the "proteome") and their interactions. As if that weren't a difficult enough task (given that the total number of proteins isn't known even approximately), a "global understanding" of the proteome may be even harder to achieve.
The Protein Hunters
David Ewing Duncan
Wired, April 2001, pp. 164-171
Building on the database of information built by the Human Genome Project, researchers and entrepreneurs are preparing to mount a much larger effort in the field of "proteomics" to develop a wide variety of new medicines.
The Next Wave of the Genomics Business
Ken Garber
Technology Review, July/August 2000, pp. 46-56
The field is called "structural genomics" or "functional genomics". What it's really about is determining the structure and function of proteins that genes code for. Highly automated techniques are being developed to allow laboratories to determine the structures of hundreds of proteins per year.
The Next Genome Project
Antonio Regalado
Technology Review, May/June 1998, pp. 51-53
Mapping the human genome is only the first step. Even more important is the field of proteomics -- figuring out the interactions among the proteins coded for by the genes.


Recommended references: Books


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