Open Questions: Prions

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See also: Protein chemistry and biology

Introduction


Recommended references: Web sites

Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Recommended references: Books

Introduction



Recommended references: Web sites

Site indexes

Prions
Short list of links, by Robert Siegel.
Galaxy: Prions
Categorized site directory. Entries usually include descriptive annotations.

Sites with general resources

Prion diseases
Very good general information on prions and prion diseases, with a few external links, by Shaun Heaphy.
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease/Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
Pages on these diseases produced by the UK Department of Health.
Prion Diseases
A collection of resources on prion diseases, provided by the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NIAID Research on Prion Diseases
Single-page summary on prion disease research sponsored by the U. S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies
Page provided by the World Health Organization, providing brief information and links to other resources.
New Scientist: BSE and vCJD
News articles from New Scientist on BSE and vCJD, and prions in general.
Stanley Prusiner
Home page of the discoverer of prions. Includes a brief summary and list of publications.

Surveys, overviews, tutorials

Prion
Article from Wikipedia. See also Bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.
Mad Cow's Human Toll
Brief May 2001 article from Scientific American, subtitled "The unfolding mystery of prion disease and its ultimate casualties."
Blood Test for Prions?
November 2000 Scientific American news article about a test for prions that uses blood plasminogens.
Stopping Prions from Going Mad
May 2000 Scientific American In Depth article, subtitled "Researchers scramble to learn how to disarm the infectious agents behind mad cow disease, scrapie and their human counterpart, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease."
What is a Prion?
October 1999 Scientific American Ask the Experts feature, with answers by several scientists.
How Prions Leap Species
March 8, 2001 news article from Scientific American.


Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

The Prion Anomaly
Alain Bussard
Seed Magazine, December-January 2006
The Prion Diseases
Stanley B. Prusiner
Scientific American, January 1995, pp. 48-57
Although prions do not contain genetic material, they are able to reproduce by reshaping a host's proteins into copies of themselves. Prion infections cause neurodegenerative diseases in animals and humans.


Recommended references: Books


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