Open Questions: Carbon Nanotubes

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See also: Nanotechnology - Nanobiotechnology

Introduction

Nanotubes

Fullerenes

Graphene


Recommended references: Web sites

Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Recommended references: Books

Introduction



Recommended references: Web sites

Site indexes

The Nanotube Site
Large collection of external links in a number of categories, but mostly without annotations, by David Tománek, a professor of theoretical condensed matter physics.


Sites with general resources

Richard E. Smalley
1996 Nobel Prize winner in chemistry for work on carbon fullerenes. Site has links to various articles on carbon nanotubes.
Carbon Nanotechnology Laboratory
At Rice University, part of the Rice Quantum Institute.
A carbon nanotube page
Useful but brief information on carbon nanotubes, by Peter Harris. Includes a bibliography of relevant books and papers, as well as external links.
Nanotube Research in David Tománek's Group
Includes simulations of carbon nanotubes, and a long list of the group's research publications.
Carbon Nanotechnologies, Inc.
Commercial enterprise developing applications for carbon nanotubes.
Cees Dekker
Home page of researcher at the Delft University of Technology. Focus on carbon nanotubes, nanotube electronics, and molecular biophysics (use of DNA). Has some external links.
Molecular Biophysics Group
At Delft University of Technology. Research group of Cees Dekker. Research focuses on carbon nanotubes, DNA and enzymes, nanofluidics, and DNA-mediated assembly.
Carbon nanotubes
Description of research into carbon nanotubes being conducted at IBM's research laboratories.
Carbon Nanotubes at Cambridge
"We are developing carbon nanotube technology (both multiwall and single wall) for a variety of applications which include electron guns, displays, vacuum and solid state electronic applications. Our work is focussed on Si wafer-scale or glass compatible, direct growth of carbon nanotubes. Our work also extends to semiconducting nanowires." The site includes a discussion forum, an overview of nanotubes, a list of published papers, and some external links.
Carbon Nanomaterials Group
Home page of a research group at the University of Nottingham (UK). The group primarily works with fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. The site describes research activities and provides a bibliography of publications and press articles.
Nano Site at the University of Southern Denmark
Covers activities involving nanoscience, nanotechnology, and nanobusiness. There are separate areas for nanobioscience and nanotechnology. The site also has a pages of news and external links.


Surveys, overviews, tutorials

Carbon nanotube
Article from Wikipedia.
Graphene could accelerate genomics
October 2008 article from nanotechweb.org. "The "wonder material" graphene could soon be used to analyse DNA at a record-breaking pace. That's the claim of a physicist in the US who has proposed a new way of reading the sequence of chemical bases in a DNA strand by sending the molecule through a tiny slit in a graphene sheet."
Graphene simulations hint at future electronics
October 2007 article from nanotechweb.org. "Denis Areshkin of the US Naval Research Laboratory uses his simulation know-how to delve deeper into what makes graphene such a promising material and comes up with building blocks for future electronic devices."
Electronics with carbon nanotubes
Summary of March 2007 article from Physics World, by Phaedon Avouris, about some of the properties and applications of carbon nanotubes, especially with respect to their exceptionally high strength and heat conduction.
Drawing conclusions from graphene
Summary of November 2006 article from Physics World, by Antonio Castro Neto, Francisco Guinea and Nuno Miguel Peres. "In a time when cutting-edge scientific research is expensive and complex, it seems absurd that a breakthrough in physics could be achieved with simple adhesive tape. But in 2004, Andre Geim, Kostya Novoselov and co-workers at the University of Manchester in the UK did just that. By delicately cleaving a sample of graphite with sticky tape, they produced something that was long considered impossible: a sheet of crystalline carbon just one atom thick, known as graphene."
Making nanotube devices the easy way
September 2004 article from Nanotechweb.org. "Researchers at Stanford University, US, have come up with a relatively simple technique for making devices based on short single-walled carbon nanotubes. The method, which combines photolithography and shadow evaporation, does not require electron beam lithography."
Scientists see through carbon nanotubes
September 2004 article from Nanotechweb.org. "Researchers at the University of Florida, US, and MTA SzFKI in Hungary have created transparent electrically conducting films of single-walled carbon nanotubes. They used the films to make an electric field-activated optical modulator, demonstrating their potential application in photonic devices."
Quantum change for nanotubes
July 2004 article from Physics World, by Jing Kong, Leo Kauwenhoven, and Cees Dekker. "A metallic carbon nanotube can be made into a semiconductor and vice versa when a magnetic field is combined with a little quantum mechanics."
Carbon nanotube transistor is 'better than silicon'
November 2002 article from Nanotechweb.org. "Researchers at Stanford University, Cornell University and Purdue University in the US have produced a carbon nanotube transistor that they claim has better properties than silicon transistors of an equivalent size. The device uses zirconium oxide rather than silicon dioxide, which has a lower dielectric constant, as the gate insulator."
Nanotube devices in the pipeline
April 2001 news article from Physicsweb, about electronic behavior of several types of nanotubes.
Carbon nanotubes roll on
June 2000 article from Physics World, by Valerie Jamieson. The article introduces an entire issue devoted to nanotubes. "The remarkable properties of carbon nanotubes may allow them to play a crucial role in the relentless drive towards miniaturization at the nanometre scale."
Multiwall carbon nanotubes
June 2000 article from Physics World, by Christian Schönenberger and Laszlo Forró. "The unique mechanical and electronic properties of multiwall nanotubes are proving to be a rich source of new physics and could also lead to new applications in materials and devices ."
Single-wall carbon nanotubes
Summary of a June 2000 article from Physics World, by Paul McEuen, about the creation of tiny nanoelectronic devices in which nanotubes are the active element.
Industry sizes up nanotubes
Summary of a June 2000 article from Physics World, by Walt de Heer and Richard Martel, about the technological hurdles that need to be overcome before large-scale applications of nanotubes reach the market.
Controlling nanotube growth
Summary of a June 2000 article from Physics World, by Hongjie Dai, about the latest research on the growth of nanotubes.
Nanotubes and supercurrents
August 1999 article from Physics World, by Michel Devoret. Recent experiments confirm "that carbon nanotubes really are the ideal molecular wires that, until recently, only existed in the dreams of physicists."
Carbon nanotubes
January 1998 article from Physics World, by Mildred Dresselhaus, Gene Dresselhaus, Peter Eklund, and Riichiro Saito. "Theory suggests that carbon nanotubes have a variety of useful properties, and experiments to test these redictions are just becoming possible."
Nanotube devices in the pipeline
April 2001 news article from Physics World about determination of the electronic behavior of nanotubes and discovery of a method to separate metallic and semiconducting nanotubes.
Nanotransistors at room temperature
May 1998 news article from Physics World about a transistor based on a carbon nanotube that works at room temperature.
Graphene Electronics Inches Closer to Mass Production
February 2009 Scientific American article, subtitled "These carbon nanosheets are considered the future of smaller, faster and cheaper electronics."
Move Over Nanotube, Here Comes Graphene
April 2007 Scientific American In Focus article, subtitled "The next big thing in nanotech is right under your pencil."
The Tiniest Carbon Nanotubes
November 2000 Scientific American news story.
Tantalizing Tubes
June 2000 story from Scientific American explaining how the electrical and tensile strength properties of carbon nanotubes suggest possible applications as diverse as electronic components and spacecraft.
Mega Steps Toward the Nanochip
April 2001 Wired News article on a transistors made from carbon nanotubes.
Discovering the Fullerenes
Nobel lecture by Richard Smalley, December 7, 1996.


Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Carbon flatland
Alexandra Witze
Science News, August 13, 2011
Graphene’s two dimensions offer new physics, novel electronics.
Tiny tubes, big riddles
Rachel Ehrenberg
Science News, December 4, 2010
Carbon cylinders' odd traits continue to stump scientists.
Carbon Wonderland
Andre K. Geim; Philip Kim
Scientific American, March 2008
Electron superhighway
Davide Castelvecchi
Science News, September 29, 2007
Nanotubes in the Clean Room
Gary Stix
Scientific American, February 2005
The Nanotube Computer
David Rotman
Technology Review, March 2002, pp. 36-45
Carbon nanotubes may see application very soon in inexpensive flat panel displays. But use of nanotubes to replace silicon in electronic parts such as computer memory and logic may still be a decade off.
Wires of Wonder
Technology Review, March 2001, pp. 86-91
Interview with Nobel prize winner Richard Smalley, lead investigator who discovered carbon nanotubes.
Molecular Beauty
Ivan Amato
Discover, February 2001, pp. 20-21
Research on carbon nanotubes is investigating a variety of ways they might be used for electronic applications.
Nanotubes for Electronics
Philip G. Collins; Phaedon Avouris
Scientific American, December 2000, pp. 62-69
Because of their electrical properties, carbon nanotubes may be used in microcircuits with feature sizes as small as 2% of the what is possible with silicon technology.
Carbon Nanotubes as Molecular Quantum Wires
Cees Dekker
Physics Today, May 1999, pp. 22-28
Nanotubes can behave as either conducting metals or semiconductors. Their quantum properties may lead to revolutionary microelectronic applications.
Fullerene Nanotubes: C1,000,000 and Beyond
Boris I. Yakobson; Richard E. Smalley
American Scientist, July-August 1997, pp 324-337
Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary strength and a number of other striking properties such as electrical conductivity in a quantized fashion. They may have significant applications if extremely challenging technical problems can be solved.


Recommended references: Books


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