Open Questions: Advanced Networking Technology

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See also: Optical and optoelectronic technology -- Advanced networking applications

Introduction


Recommended references: Web sites

Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Recommended references: Books

Introduction



Recommended references: Web sites

Site indexes


Sites with general resources

National Lambda Rail
NLR "is a major initiative of U.S. research universities and private sector technology companies to provide a national scale infrastructure for research and experimentation in networking technologies and applications." The site includes a description of the network architecture and news releases.
PlanetLab
PlanetLab is a testbed for experimenting with "disruptive" new networking technologies on the Internet. The site includes news releases and information on the projects and technologies being researched.


Surveys, overviews, tutorials

Optical fiber
Article from Wikipedia.


Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Breaking the Metro Bottleneck
Jeff Hecht
Technology Review, June 2001, pp. 48-53
Logistical problems add to the difficulties of improving network bandwidth in a "metropolitan" area as compared to the long-haul backbone. Possible solutions include passive optical networking and gigabit ethernet.
Building a Better Backbone
Neil Savage
Technology Review, June 2001, pp. 40-46
A number of techniques are being employed to allow higher rates of information transmission in existing glass fibers. These include means for adding more data channels and using higher transmission frequencies. But when it will be economically practical to install such new technology is another question.
The Next Generation of Optical Fibers
Philip Ball
Technology Review, May 2001, pp. 55-61
Although technologies such as DWDM have provided adequate communications bandwidth for the present in fiber optic networks, we will eventually encounter the limits of existing fiber optics. But a new generation of fiber technology is on the horizon to take over when needed, based on hollow fibers and "photonic band gap" materials.
The Triumph of the Light
Gary Stix
Scientific American, January 2001, pp. 80-87
The capacity of fiber optic transmission for a fixed price is doubling every nine months. This will tend to keep supply of communication bandwidth ahead of demand for some time to come, although new applications which can use all available bandwidth will eventually arrive.
The Microphotonics Revolution
Peter Fairley
Technology Review, July/August 2000, pp. 38-44
Optical switches that do not require conversion of signals to electronic form are the next step to an all-optical Internet. Some of the technology being used in such switches may ultimately be used in optical integrated circuits.
Fiber Optics to the Home
Jeff Hecht
Technology Review, March-April 2000, pp. 48-54
The "last mile" problem, which is more economic than technological, is the most serious obstacle to the deployment of advanced network services. There are different approaches to providing fiber optics directly to homes, as well as competing technologies for the shorter term.
The Light at the End of the Pipe
P. William Bane; Stephen P. Bradley
Scientific American, October 1999, pp. 110-113
The emergence of broadband Internet that will be of use to a significant percentage of the population depends on the development of new applications -- such as video conferencing and smart agents -- which offer clearly superior utility.
All-Optical Networks
Vincent W. S. Chan
Scientific American, September 1995, pp. 72-76
Present use of fiber optics in communication networks is constrained by the need to use electronic devices to perform switching operations. New technologies are needed to allow control of optical signals without using electronics.


Recommended references: Books


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