Open Questions: Supercomputers and Grid Computing

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Introduction

Parallel processing


Recommended references: Web sites

Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Recommended references: Books

Introduction



Recommended references: Web sites

Site indexes

Galaxy: Supercomputing and Parallel Computing
Categorized site directory. Entries usually include descriptive annotations.
Galaxy: High Performance Computing
Categorized site directory. Entries usually include descriptive annotations.

Sites with general resources

Top 500 Supercomputer Sites
This site is dedicated to maintaining a census of installed and soon-to-become-available high-end supercomputers.
Grid.org
"Grid.org is a single destination site for large-scale, non-profit research projects of global significance." The projects run on millions of personal computers and include cancer research, smallpox research, and computation of protein structure of all human proteins.
Intel Tera-scale Computing
"The Intel Tera-scale Computing Research Program is Intel's R&D effort to scale today's dual-core and multi-core processors up to designs that have the tens or hundreds of energy-efficient cores with teraflops of compute capability."
International Supercomputer Conference
Yearly conference on supercomputers, held in Europe.
Project HTMT
NASA Web site for the HTMT project developing trans-petaflop computer systems.
NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division
Site contains information about the organization, feature stories on the research, published papers and reports, and software. One of the main projects is NASA's Information Power Grid, which has some useful external links and references on grid computing.
Blue Gene
Information on IBM's 360 teraflop Blue Gene computer family, including discussion of some of its aplications. Related information includes an issue of the IBM Journal of Research and Development about Blue Gene,
BlueGene/L
Information on the general configuration and expected applications of the BlueGene computer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.
ASCI Purple RFP
Lawrence Livermore Laboratory request for proposals for a 100 teraflop computer to be completed in 2004. The project was awarded to IBM.
Earth Simulator Center
Home page of the Japanese research facility which as of 2002 is using a 35 teraflop computer developed by NEC.
Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative
Pages at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory dealing mostly with the ASCI White supercomputer, including a June 29, 2000 press release describing the capabilities of the system.
Cray X1
Commercially available supercomputer developed by Cray, Inc. with performance up to 52 teraflops.
VirginiaTech Terascale Cluster
Description of the Terascale Cluster project at Virginia Tech.
NAS Project: Columbia
General information and news from the NASA Advanced Supercompting (NAS) Division on its latest supercomputer, Columbia, which is capable of peak speeds around 50 teraflops.

Surveys, overviews, tutorials

Supercomputer
Article from Wikipedia.
Grid computing
Article from Wikipedia.
Grand challenge problem
Article from Wikipedia.
Building the next IT revolution
October 2003 article from Physics World, by Steve Lloyd. "A new chapter in scientific computing opened earlier this summer when a prototype of the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) was deployed across three continents. The LCG project is designed to meet the unprecedented computing requirements of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is currently being constructed at CERN."
IBM gears up to gene challenge
August 2003 article from Physics World, by Robert P. Crease. "Designed to simulate how proteins fold, IBM's powerful Blue Gene computer could transform medical science."
Simulating the Planet Earth
May 2002 article by NEC about its Earth Simulator supercomputer
A Hybrid Technology Multithreaded (HTMT) Computer Architecture for Petaflops Computing
Long 1997 technical paper by Thomas Sterling giving an overview of HTMT computer architecture.


Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Grid Computing
W. Mitchell Waldrop
Technology Review, May 2002, pp. 30-37
When even the most powerful individual computers are not up to the most difficult computing tasks, the next alternative is to combine a number of such machines through an ultra-high-speed network that serves up computing resources much like the electric power grid delivers electricity.
How to Build a Hypercomputer
Thomas Sterling
Scientific American, July 2001, pp. 38-45
Supercomputer speeds continue to increase rapidly, yet never seem to be enough for applications in climatology, medicine, astronomy, bioscience, controlled fusion, nanotechnology, and many other areas. A variety of technological approaches are being pursued to achieve petaflop performance.
Gene Machine
Oliver Morton
Wired, July 2001, pp. 148-159
Computing the structure of proteins is a daunting challenge. IBM's "Blue Gene" project is developing a petaflop (1000 teraflop) computer to attack the problem by 2004.
Monsters in a Box
David Pescovitz
Wired, December 2000, pp. 341-347
New massively parallel supercomputers capable of teraflop speeds are starting to be employed for commercial as well as scientific applications.


Recommended references: Books


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