Open Questions: Bionics

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Introduction

Brain interfaces


Recommended references: Web sites

Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Recommended references: Books

Introduction



Recommended references: Web sites

Site indexes


Sites with general resources

BCI-info
A "portal for brain-computer interfaces". It describes itself like so: "BCI-info is an open international platform for Brain-Computer Interface research intended to provide information for scientists, patients, students, the media, and people from the general public interested in BCI technology." Site features include general information, research information, and news about BCI.
Center for Neural Interfaces
Research group working on multichannel interfaces to the nervous system.
Intraocular Retinal Prosthesis Group
Research group at Johns Hopkins University.
The Retinal Implant Project
Research project at MIT.
Group of BioMedical Physics and Ophthalmic Technologies
Research group at Stanford University that is developing a retinal prosthesis.
The Southampton Brain-Computer Interface Research Programme
Research group at Southampton University (UK). The site includes information on publications, research themes, and external links.


Surveys, overviews, tutorials

Bionics
Article from Wikipedia.
Vision of beauty
May 2011 article from Physics World. "As sensors in digital cameras fast approach the 127 megapixels of the human eye, clinical trials are under way to implant this technology directly into the retina. But Richard Taylor cautions that such devices must be adapted for humans, because of the special nature by which we see."
Spare parts
August 2009 article. "A bionic eye, a new heart grown in the lab, spinal implants that will help quadriplegics walk again... Will we soon be able to replace any body part at will?"
Of cells and wires
January 2009 article from The Scientist, subtitled "The first step to computer augmentation and neuroprosthetics lies in the connection between nerve cell and metal. How are" scientists bridging the gap?
Putting Thoughts into Action: Implants Tap the Thinking Brain
November 2008 Scientific American Mind article. "Researchers are decoding the brain to give a voice and a hand to the paralyzed - and to learn how it controls our movements."
In the 70s he was a TV fantasy. Now the bionic man is real - and he even plays sax
April 2006 article from The Guardian.
Monkey See, Robot Do
November 2000 Scientific American news article about an interface that allows monkeys to control a robot arm with thought.
The Coming Merging of Mind and Machine
September 1999 article from a special issue of Scientific American by Ray Kurzweil. A summary presentation of the author's somewhat futuristic vision of the future evolution of machine intelligence.


Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Mind-Controlled
Susan Gaidos
Science News, July 2, 2011
Linking brain and computer may soon lead to practical prosthetics for daily life.
Of Cells and Wires
Edyta Zielinska
The Scientist, January 2009
The first step to computer augmentation and neuroprosthetics lies in the connection between nerve cell and metal. How are scientists bridging the gap?
Jacking into the Brain--Is the Brain the Ultimate Computer Interface?
Gary Stix
Scientific American, November 2008
Controlling Robots with the Mind
Miguel A. L. Nicolelis; John K. Chapin
Scientific American, October 2002,
Artificial Sight
Gregory Cerio
Discover, August 2001, pp. 50-55
The technology of cochlear implants had made it possible for victims of some kinds of deafness to "hear" to a limited extent. So it seems natural to investigate whether a similar approach can provide at least a limited sort of vision for blind people.
Mind Over Muscles
Victor D. Chase
Technology Review, March/April 2000, pp. 38-45
The combination of two bionic technologies is showing results in restoring some function to victims of paralysis. The technologies are functional electrical stimulation, which allow electrical signals to control muscles, and brain-computer interfacing, which interprets a patient's intentions from EEG monitoring of brain waves.


Recommended references: Books


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